Stress, pollution and bad cholesterol!! What to do? It turns out the three unrelated. Interrelated and mutually trigger. Stress and pollution are two of the many factors that can add breeding "collection" bad cholesterol in the body. 


We recognize stress as a cause of the disease is, so it is definitely. Undeniable. Also been long known. And recent findings stated that due to job stress can alter the way the body metabolizes fat.

This condition can lead to increasing levels of "bad" cholesterol or low density lipoprotein (LDL) and raises the risk of heart disease. An expert in Spanish research found that stressful situations can affect the way the body metabolizes fat, which ended in LDL cholesterol levels soaring.

Previous research experts say, the emotional stress associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease which is the result of unhealthy habits such as smoking, unbalanced diet, lack of physical activity, and other factors.

Research experts in Spain found that stressful situations can affect the way the body metabolizes fat, which ended in LDL cholesterol levels soaring.

Previous research experts say, the emotional stress associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease which is the result of unhealthy habits such as smoking, unbalanced diet, lack of physical activity, and other factors.


However, the results of this new study suggests that stress can trigger dyslipidemia, namely the transfer of impaired lipid and lipoproteins in the blood.



Researchers from the Hospital Virgen de la Victoria in Malaga and Santiago de Compostela University analyzed the relationship between work stress and other parameters related to how fatty acids are metabolized by the body.

The study, published in the Scandinavian Journal of Public Health has analyzed on a population of more than 90,000 employees who carry out medical examinations.

One of the researchers Carlos Catalina, who is also a clinical pskilog and experts in the field say job stress, workers who have difficulties in their work during the past 12 months have a higher risk of dyslipidemia. The number of participants who experienced stress in this study is as much as 8.7 percent.

Dyslipidemia resulted in increased levels of total cholesterol and "bad" cholesterol and triglycerides. It also resulted in decreased levels of "good" cholesterol. Study finds more displidemia risk was found in those stressful work.

High levels of "bad" cholesterol and triglycerides, and low levels of "good" cholesterol increases the risk of plaque forming in the arteries that lead to hardening of the arteries. Hardening of the arteries increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.

In another study with a different theme turned out to exposure to pollution is not only bad for the lungs but can also change the "good" cholesterol (high-density lipoprotein / HDL) to "bad". Such changes contribute to the blockage of the arteries that increases the risk of heart disease.

The research team consisting of scientists from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and other institutions found inhaling smoke pollution may alter the structure of HDL in the body. In addition, these activities also activate other components that cause oxidation damage to cells and tissues premature triggering inflammation and hardening of the arteries.

The study, published in the journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology conducted a study on mice. The first group of rats exposed to fumes a few hours per day, for two weeks. The first group of rats subsequently placed for a week in the cage with the air that has been filtered.

The second group with the same treatment, but not placed in cages with filtered air. While the third group was given only exposure to filtered air for two weeks.

Mice that received exposure to fumes have oxidative damage in the blood and heart. Even this damage can not be repaired after being given a clean air exposure is performed on the first group.

Senior study author Dr.. Jesus Araujo, professor of medicine and director of environmental cardiology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, said this study shows air pollution can increase HDL dysfunction and activate internal oxidation pathway. Consequently, obstruction of vessels that got so bad that trigger heart disease and stroke.

Particle emissions from vehicle fumes enveloped found chemicals sensitive to free radicals. These particles are known to cause oxidation.

Author of the study and a researcher in the division of cardiology at the Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA recommends people limit exposure to air pollution to reduce the negative impacts.


Source: From Various Sources

Health and Beauty Info© 2014. All Rights Reserved. Template By Seocips.com
SEOCIPS Areasatu Adasenze Tempate Tipeex.com